Australian Pine - Casaurina equisetfolia in Florida

  Australian Pine – Casaurina equisetfolia

Australian Pine in Florida

The Australian Pine is also known as she-oak, sheoak, ironwood and beefwood. They are common in tropical and sub-tropical areas. Despite having low wind resistance, they have been planted in many tropical places to create windbreaks. The wood of the tree has been used often for building materials. There roots and needles have been used as a natural nitrogen source and is therefore quite often used for mulch.The number of Australian Pines has almost quadrupled in southern Florida in the last 10 years and as a result is considered an invasive species. All of the municipalities in Pinellas county allow the removal of an Australian Pine without a permit. In fact, municipalities such as Largo Florida require the removal of this tree when a tree removal permit for a different tree is filed for and granted.

  • Native: No
  • Appearance: This in an evergreen tree that is capable of reaching 150 feet in height. It is generally a single trunked tree. The trunk is reddish brown to grey with rough, brittle, peeling bark
  • Leaves: They are scaled and whorled around grayish-green branches. The scales are 1.3 mm long and there are 6-8 needles per whorl
  • Fruit:1 seeded, winged nutlet contained in the cone
  • Flowers:Not easily found. It is inside the female in the cone-like cluster and in the male in small terminal spikes
  • Classifications:
    1. Florida Noxious Weed
    2. Florida Prohibited Aquatic Plants List
Australian Pine Branchlets with Needles

Australian Pine Branches with Needles

Australian Pine Bark

Australian Pine Bark